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Teaching American History

    Table of contents
    1. 1. The West Shore Consortium for Dynamic History Instruction has been offering professional deveolopment opportunities to 5th - 12th grade US History teacher in West Michigan since the winter of 2006.  During that time, over 200 individual teachers have attended at least one event.  Many have attended multiple events.  The result has been a huge amount of growth and learning among teachers from more nearly 20 unique school districts. 
          1. 1.1.1.1. How to use the site:
      1. 1.2. Summer Institute 2013
    2. 2. __________________________________________
        1. 2.1.1. Remember - This is YOUR site!  YOU can author content.  YOU can edit.  YOU can post docs, videos, and images!  Do it!
        2. 2.1.2. Can't open a file posted here?
    3. 3. So, why is a Wiki so special, anyway?
      1. 3.1. More than once, teachers have asked for a way to collaboritively share not only what they learn during events, but also what they discover once they return to their classroom with what they've learned at a Consortium event.This site is yours.  As a US History teacher, you possess the knowledge, experience, and resources to make this site a powerful resource for you and your colleagues.  Consider this:  If everyone involved with the Consortium contributed just ONE lesson plan, we would already have amassed 200 lesson plans for everyone to use.  What if you have an ok lesson plan, but need some suggestions on what would make it great?  Post it here and dozens of other teachers can dig right in and edit your work.  What if you know of a great website that would really enhance what another teacher is trying to do?  Edit their lesson plan to add the website and a quick note. 

    The West Shore Consortium for Dynamic History Instruction has been offering professional deveolopment opportunities to 5th - 12th grade US History teacher in West Michigan since the winter of 2006.  During that time, over 200 individual teachers have attended at least one event.  Many have attended multiple events.  The result has been a huge amount of growth and learning among teachers from more nearly 20 unique school districts. 

    How to use the site:

    Choose a subject from the navigation bar on the left, or click one of the shortcuts below to access documents from a recent presentation or event.

    __________________________________________

    Remember - This is YOUR site!  YOU can author content.  YOU can edit.  YOU can post docs, videos, and images!  Do it!

    Can't open a file posted here?

    You might notice that some of the files posted on this site end with ".docx" or ".pptx".  Newer versions of Microsoft Office applications use this file format and they aren't immediately viewable if you have an older version of PowerPoint, Word, or Excel.  But don't worry!  Microsoft offers a small software component you can install that will allow you open the files.  Click Here to go to Microsoft's site and download the component.  Once installed, you should be good to go!

    So, why is a Wiki so special, anyway?

    Put quite simply, it's a collaborative webpage.  Let's take a minute to ponder the word "collaborative".  Many webpages are "interactive" today, and many of us (and probably more or our students) are quite comfortable with this idea.  You can leave a comment on a blog or you can comment on a news story. When you do this, you're interacting with the content that's already there, but not changing it or adding to it.  We can't log into the local television news station website and change the content of the news story...and that's probably a good thing.  But with a Wiki, everyone who has access to the site can edit it...work with it...enhance and enrich it.  You are no longer restricted to leaving a comment about an unchangeable piece of content.  Rather, in the context of the Wiki you're using, you are one of many authors, editors, and proofreaders.

    More than once, teachers have asked for a way to collaboritively share not only what they learn during events, but also what they discover once they return to their classroom with what they've learned at a Consortium event.This site is yours.  As a US History teacher, you possess the knowledge, experience, and resources to make this site a powerful resource for you and your colleagues.  Consider this:  If everyone involved with the Consortium contributed just ONE lesson plan, we would already have amassed 200 lesson plans for everyone to use.  What if you have an ok lesson plan, but need some suggestions on what would make it great?  Post it here and dozens of other teachers can dig right in and edit your work.  What if you know of a great website that would really enhance what another teacher is trying to do?  Edit their lesson plan to add the website and a quick note. 

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    Viewing 4 of 4 comments: view all
    Greg: Please see the paragraph I've added above regarding opening .pptx files with older versions of PowerPoint.
    Posted 02:50, 25 Feb 2010
    American Progress Explanation
    http://www.csub.edu/~gsantos/img0061.html
    School Book not a Bible in her right hand
    Posted 17:17, 26 Feb 2010
    Did it! Viewed it! All Good!!!
    Posted 21:40, 21 Jul 2010
    Congratulations John on your new job at West Ottawa. You did a great job at the ISD and you will be a great addition to the field of public education!!
    Posted 17:09, 24 Aug 2010
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